Wolves – 2014

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By James Beer

As Americans and Europeans awaken to the ancient realities of cohabiting with wolves in settled landscapes from which they were extirpated 50 to hundreds of years ago, all manner of heated discussions, questions and coalitions are emerging.

While wolves have persisted for eons in undeveloped landscapes from the wilds of Canada and Alaska to the vast primitive-societal landscapes of Asia; the re-introduction, protection and spread of wolves in Europe and The Lower 48 States of the US in recent decades has precipitated disagreements and political chaos of enormous proportions. National politicians in Europe and the US have partnered with environmental and animal rights organizations representing mainly urban voters and environmental specialist-scientists to enact laws and regulations responsible for the current situation. Opponents of such laws and programs are mainly rural livestock producers, dog owners, hunters, parents, grandparents, the rural poor and an assortment of rural recreationists and rural amateur naturalists from mushroom and berry pickers to plant and rock collectors.

According to the IUCN, wolves currently inhabit 4 continents. They occur in contiguous populations from the uncounted hundreds of thousands (to millions?) in Asia to the Canada/Alaska population estimated to be approaching one hundred thousand. While these populations “spill” into Europe and The Lower 48 US states naturally and periodically; national (federal) US government laws and European (Union) government laws have been passed to forcibly reintroduce and protect wolves throughout their (the wolves) “original” range regardless of the adverse impacts. The rationale for this is that “native” species “belong” wherever they once existed.<<<To Continue Reading this, download full article in PDF>>>

Jim Beers is a retired US Fish & Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist, Special Agent, Refuge Manager, Wetlands Biologist, and Congressional Fellow. He was stationed in North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York City, and Washington DC. He also served as a US Navy Line Officer in the western Pacific and on Adak, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands. He has worked for the Utah Fish & Game, Minneapolis Police Department, and as a Security Supervisor in Washington, DC. He testified three times before Congress; twice regarding the theft by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of $45 to 60 Million from State fish and wildlife funds and once in opposition to expanding Federal Invasive Species authority. He resides in Eagan, Minnesota with his wife of many decades.